Peru

Displaying 51 - 100 of 117
Catalog # Name Description
51 1970.78.15.23 Necklace This necklaces has seeds, beads, and bone used in decoration. The pattern that makes up the necklace is a seed, two white beads, eight blue beads, two white beads, and ends in another seed. The Strand ends with the blue beads fastened into the piranha jawbone. Hanging from the jawbone are three strands. The outer strands have six red beads, two yellow beads, and two gray seeds. The proper left strand has a single yellow bead beneath the seeds. The middle strand has two black beads, three yellow beads, two black beads, two white beads, one brown seed, and ends in two white seeds. 1970.78.15.23 (Necklace) image
52 1970.78.15.24 Bracelet This bracelet is made with fiber ties and colourful beads that form a geometric diamond pattern. The Shipibo-Conibo have geometric designs on much of their pottery and art. These geometric patterns and symbols were part of a codified system that represents different aspects of their beliefs; however, though it is still used for decorating the ability to translate this language has been lost over time and outside interference with the culture. Women create the art among the Shipibo-Conibo. 1970.78.15.24 (Bracelet) image
53 1970.78.16.1 Necklace Brown seed necklace with seven pendants of birds carved from nut shells. The string is made from Chambira, a natural palm fiber found in the Amazon Rainforest near the Ticuna.
54 1970.78.16.2 Necklace Mottled gray and white seeds form the band of the necklace with 7 pendants of birds carved from nut shells. The string of the necklace is made from Chambira, a natural palm fiber found in the Amazon Rainforest near the Ticuna.
55 1970.78.17.2.1 Earring This earring is made from wood, seeds, and fiber. There is a long piece of fiber that the earring is looped through to wear. It is attached with two small brown seeds to a circular piece of wood wityh a depiction of an arrow and an animal in the center of it that has a small, triangular piece dangling from it with a face painted on it. There are seeds and beetle wings decorating the string that binds the two together.
56 1970.78.17.2.2 Earring This earring is made from wood, seeds, and fiber. There is a long piece of fiber that the earring is looped through to wear. It is attached with two small brown seeds to a circular piece of wood with a that has been lost that has a small, triangular piece dangling from it with what could be a man running depicted on it. There are seeds and beetle wings decorating the string that binds the two together.
57 1970.78.17.3 Panpipe Twelve pipes ranging from 7" long to 2 1/2" long and from 7/16" wide to 5/16" wide, bound to two crosspieces with thin, brown string. Music is a large part of the Ticunan culture and men make the musical instruments.
58 1970.78.17.4 Bag Handwoven dyed fiber with three green and maroon horizontal bands. This is made from palm fibers native to the Amazon Rainforest, probably Chambira, by women in the Ticuan culture. This was used to collect things in the field and worn with the strap around the head and the bag hanging down the back.
59 1970.78.2.0001 Basket Double woven. Color: TN Men among the Awajún are in charge of basketry.
60 1970.78.2.0002 Basket Double woven.
61 1970.78.2.3 Skirt Handwoven vertical design; worn by a chief. Two pieces sewn together. Color: BR,BK Men are in charge of the textile crafting.
62 1970.78.2.4 Vest Million seeded vest for chief. 74 loops of small brown seeds 25" long on fine thread woven into 2 strings. Strands are linked at two points by white cord that is braided around strands to keep them together but separated to form a band. The vest is worn as a status symbol by a chief of the Awajún people.
63 1970.78.2.5 Vest Seeds alternate white/red and black/white, etc. Toucan feathers are white with some black and red and black with yellow and red. Worn by a chief. 1970.78.2.5 (Vest) image
64 1970.78.2.6A Earring These are earrings made from iridescent beetle wings and toucan feathers. Previously among the Awajún both men and women wore earrings. The men wore earrings made of beetle wings and toucan feathers, like these ones, and women wore earrings made entirely of toucan feathers. Both sexes have a small loop in their earlobes permanently on which they can hang different earrings. The toucan feathers are glued together by a native resin and this is an everyday ornamentation. For special occasions the earrings are made from two types of beetles and called "akite-tóika" after the beetles the wings are from. On these special occasions, the earrings are fastened with perforated bone and strung with glass pearls instead of simply attached to the small loop in the earlobe. They have three bundles of toucan feathers at the top and each strand of wings are taken from the Shining leaf chafer beetle and have a bundle of toucan feathers at the bottom. 1970.78.2.6A (Earring) image
65 1970.78.2.6B Earring These are earrings made from iridescent beetle wings and toucan feathers. Previously among the Awajún both men and women wore earrings. The men wore earrings made of beetle wings and toucan feathers, like these ones, and women wore earrings made entirely of toucan feathers. Both sexes have a small loop in their earlobes permanently on which they can hang different earrings. The toucan feathers are glued together by a native resin and this is an everyday ornamentation. For special occasions the earrings are made from two types of beetles and called "akite-tóika" after the beetles the wings are from. On these special occasions, the earrings are fastened with perforated bone and strung with glass pearls instead of simply attached to the small loop in the earlobe. They have three bundles of toucan feathers at the top and each strand of wings are taken from the Shining leaf chafer beetle and have a bundle of toucan feathers at the bottom.
66 1970.78.2.7 Headdress Headdress worn by men in the Awajún culture. Made from macaw feathers and tied onto a piece of chambira, a woven palm fiber natural to the Amazon Rainforest. There are many different feathers varying in colours including black, yellow, red, blue, and green. Feathers are woven into the chambira backing and the headdress is worn on the forehead and tied in the back. 1970.78.2.7 (Headdress) image
67 1970.78.3.0002 Quiver With gourd container. Blow darts are very narrow and carved from light woods. They are not sharpened to a point until the hunter is ready to shoot. When he draws a blow dart he carves the tip with a piranha jaw tool and dips it in poison to paralyze his prey. He then loads the dart and blows it through the blowgun with a quick, sharp, full breath. The hunter might go through as many as 30 blow darts before he catches his prey. This quiver is worn around the neck by the cloth strap for ease of access. The quiver is made of a light wood, possibly from the native Big Leaf Mahogany tree. The blow darts are dried out and resemble reeds. The quiver shows native repair with the use of gum made from natural elements found in the area. The poison container is made from a gourd with two holes drilled through the bottom so that it can be looped on to the quiver. There is a hole in the top where the stem was and this is where the hunter would dip his arrow. There are seven nails hammered into the circumference on the bottom of the quiver and nine pieces of thin wood are wrapped around it and tied to the stick that is holding the gourd in place. 1970.78.3.0002 (Quiver) image
68 1970.78.5.0001 Basket Small, stovepipe type. Ribs of basket extend above rim and are tied together to form handle. Color: TN
69 1970.78.5.0003 Cup Medium sized drinking gourd. Tape residue on one side. Women are in charge of pottery and cooking and likely made this drinking gourd. Round gourd with a drinking hole in the top. Scratches and evidence of use among the culture. Rougher on the inside than the outside, carved out. 1970.78.5.0003 (Cup) image
70 1970.78.5.0004 Fan This fire-fan was used to keep coals burning. Made from black toucan wing and red, yellow, and white toucan body feathers. The feathers are attached to a smooth wooden handle by tying them together loosely, allowing for the feathers to flop creating a breeze to feed the coals. The white body feathers are attached by their hide and tied together in the back with white cotton string that is stained tan with age. 1970.78.5.0004 (Fan) image
71 1970.78.5.0006 Horns, beetle 22 beetle horns with eyes tied together (not native) using standard white sewing thread. These horns come from a rhinoceros beetle and were used in stringing necklaces. 1970.78.5.0006 (Horns, beetle) image
72 1970.78.5.0007 Cup Small drinking gourd. Hole in the top small scratches from natural use. Inside is lighter and rougher than the outside. Women in the Tapweyokwaka culture are in charge of crafting pottery and cooking, this gourd was most likely made by a woman but used by the entire culture. 1970.78.5.0007 (Cup) image
73 1970.78.5.2 Hammock Large, handwoven chambira. Natural in color except for 6 burgundy stripes. Color: TN,PR
74 1970.78.6.0001 Bag Handwoven. Natural in color with bands of black stripes. One piece of cloth folded to form bag and sides sewn together. Asháninka people survive by gathering fruits and vegetables from the forest as well as hunting. They would weave bags to carry home the food in woven bags like these. 1970.78.6.0001 (Bag) image
75 1970.78.6.0002 Comb Small wooden comb wrapped with burgundy colored weaving. Has string extending from center. Because Asháninkan women wear their hair long, this comb was used to keep it neat. 1970.78.6.0002 (Comb) image
76 1970.78.7.0002 Crown Alternating bands of black and white toucan feathers, touched with yellow and red, attached to a woven wood ring. White feathers are tipped in red and alternate with black feathers. The Apu ("chief") will wear this crown often accompanied with face paint. On rare visits from relatives, the man in the home wearing the crown will be the first to speak in the welcome ceremony. Known as "xarpamashi" in the native language. 1970.78.7.0002 (Crown) image
77 1970.78.7.0003 Headband These types of headbands are worn by men underneath their crown of feathers and has human hair and toucan and spatuletail hummingbird feathers dangling from the end. Some of the feathers are from the toucan's body, but most still have the skin attached to them. The feathers and hair are attached to strings of woven cotton that are then further woven into a band. The band is striped with pink and red. 1970.78.7.0003 (Headband) image
78 1970.78.9.0001A Pipe Bowl Wood, cone-shaped, pipe bowl with a knob at the bottom. Handcarved and shows evidence of cultural use. There is a small hole carved into the proper backside of the bowl in which the stem will sit. In the bowl are remains of the substance that was smoked in the culture. The pipe bowl has a large rim with a small but deep bowl hollowed out of it. 1970.78.9.0001A (Pipe Bowl) image
79 1970.78.9.0001B Pipe Stem Makisapa (a species of monkey found in the Amazonian Rainforest) bone stem that belongs to a pipe. The stem is very skinny and short, showing evidence of cultural use. The bone was crudely cut at both ends and is hollow to allow air and smoke to pass through. 1970.78.9.0001B (Pipe Stem) image
80 1970.9.0004 Sling With one tassel, brown and natural color, 3'' long. Other end has a black loop. Handle is 8" long. Cord with tassel is 39 1/2" long; other with loop is 40" long.Thick bands on sling have a diamond snake back pattern and tan, brown, and black stripes. The colors are mirrored and the diamond pattern flows into a tan braid that ends with a black woven handle. Possibly there were two black handles and one of them has been damaged.
81 1970.9.0005 Sling Part of a sling with double strands extending from handle. One side brown & 22" long, other side natural with only one strand 41" long. Sling has four bands that reflect the same designs of stripes and diamonds. Possible human hair braided into the four thicker bands.
82 1970.9.0012 Rope Braided.
83 1970.9.0013 Rope Braided rope.
84 1970.9.0015 Necklace Braided with a long tassel.
85 1970.9.0016 Cotton Raw cotton with string wrapped around much of it; string wrapped around 17" in center.
86 1970.9.0019 Poncho Neck portion of a child's poncho, light brown with dark red embroidery.
87 1970.9.0020 Broom, whisk Tightly woven handle of braided strands that come to a fringe of multiple braided strands that are all cut to be equal lengths.
88 1970.9.0023 Tape, fabric Red, woven; with yellow woven pattern in it, stylized animal designs.
89 1970.9.0024 Belt Red woven, with yellow, brown and black, and white woven pattern of stylized animals.
90 1970.9.0025 Belt Woven; brown with woven geometrical pattern in 2 browns, red, yellow, and natural.
91 1970.9.94 Necklace 7 kinds of seeds, brown, tan, white, 4 red and black Abrus precatorius seeds, large brown legume pod as pendant. There is a pattern of two small, brown seeds followed by a Job's Tear with two more of the small, brown seeds after it. There are two small, black seeds with two more of the small, brown seeds after them followed by a Job's Tear followed by a small cylinder piece of wood. Two more of the small, brown seeds follow that with two more of the small, black seeds following them. After the black seeds there is one elongated pod that is followed by a small, brown seed that is followed by a larger, rounder brown and black seed followed by an Abrus precatorius seed followed by another small, black seed that is followed by a small cylinder piece of wood that is followed by a Job's Tear and then the pattern repeats itself ending with a large legume pod.
92 1970.9.95 Necklace This necklace is made of seeds, wood, teeth, and a boar tusk. There is a pattern of three small, brown seeds that is repeated twice ending in a Job's tear followed by an Abrus precatorius that is followed by a tooth that is followed by another Job's tear that is followed by a small, cylinder piece of wood that is followed by another one of the small, brown seeds that is followed by a large nut shell that is followed by two small, brown seeds that are followed by an Abrus precatorius followed by a Job's Tear that is followed by a tooth and another Job's tear that is followed by a small cylinder piece of wood that is followed by a small, brown seed that is followed by a large nut shell, two small, dark seeds, and an Abrus precatorius that ends the pattern. The original pattern repeats itself twice coming to an end with a small Abrus precatorius and three of the small, brown seeds looping through what could be a boar tusk. 1970.9.95 (Necklace) image
93 1970.9.96 Necklace This necklace is made of seeds, wood, pods, and a pig's tooth pendant. There are Job's Tears, Abrus precatorius, Legume pods in a repeating pattern as well as small, brown, seeds and small wooden cylinders.
94 197078.15.0019E Loom This is the entire loom with the weaving attached. There are two wooden sticks that holds the strings. The cotton strings are different colours and woven into a geometric design of squares and lines. The weaving stops with another small piece of wood and leads to more open  string. The spindle is attached with the red thread. It is quite common to find geometric designs among the Shipibo-Conibo because in the past the symbols had meaning that held their beliefs and values. The ability to interpret and translate that meaning has since been lost, but the designs are still present.
95 1971.25 Fan Six long white feathers (wing primaries or tail), decorated with red, light blue, and green contour feathers and gray-white down feathers from a macaw. Handle is covered with natural color plant fibers which vaguely resemble tapa cloth. The fan is oval in shape and has a starburst of red and white down feathers at the top of the fan. There are cut wing feathers that extend in three lines from the starburst shape. From the fan handle, there is a line of gray down feathers and a second tier of red and blue underwing feathers. 1971.25 (Fan) image
96 1972.18.1 Fan Feather fan, white feathers with purple, red, green, blue, yellow, pink, orange, black, and brown feathers decoration. One side has a bird done in feathers green, brown, yellow, pink, red. Bird is standing stem of a flower yellow, green, blue. On bottom of fan is flower design in purple, red, green, and pink feathers surrounded by white down feathers. Design is on both sides of fan. At top on both sides is a design in blue, red and pink feathers.
97 1977.11 Necklace Consists of several kinds of seeds, mostly Job's Tears, interspersed with red and black Abrus precatorius (poisonous) seed and larger brown seeds. Seeds are arranged in this pattern starting from the bottom and going around: one seed, three Job's Tears, and one Abrus precatorius. The necklace and pattern ends with two strands of Job's tears followed by an Abrus precatorius and ending in two large, brown seed shells. Attached is a tag that says "Big Imports Made in Peru".
98 1977.59.0006 Spoon Spoon carved from a single piece of light wood. The bowl of the spoon is leaf-shaped and the handle is narrow where it attaches to the bowl and widens slightly at the top ending in detail. There are two triangle shapes carved out at the top, both pointing towards each other creating an intense narrowing of the spoon handle. The handle widens out again in a circular top. The spoon is hand-carved so the detail is not exact on each side.
99 1977.59.0007 Spoon Spoon is hand-carved from a single piece of light wood. The bowl has an oval shape and the handle is circular that widens and narrows at the top to form a design.
100 1977.59.0008 Cap Multi-colored, with earflaps. Knitted. Colors include yellow, green, blue, purple, brown, red, orange, pink and white. One short green cord with magenta tassel at bottom of each ear flap. Yellow and orange tassel at top. Made from Alpaca wool. 1977.59.0008 (Cap) image